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ARDU, A., CASTANGIA, G., FALCHI, P., MULARGIA, M. and PANICO, B. - Al riparo dai venti: identità  indigene e interazione culturale nell'area del Capo Mannu nel I millennio a.C.

AUTHOR

Anna Ardu, Giandaniele Castangia, Paola Falchi, Marco Mulargia, Barbara Panico

CATEGORY

Poster

LANGUAGE

Italian

ABSTRACT

The area of Capo Mannu (western Sardinia), in which the geographer Ptolemy placed the so called Korakodes portus, represents an interesting case study on the dynamics of interaction between local communities and other Mediterranean elements in west-central Sardinia during the Early Iron Age. Its strategic role as a seaport area, together with the presence of an essential resource such as salt, obtained from the pools behind the sand dunes of the major beaches of the area, are the two key factors that explain the longue durée of the human settlement in this region. Yet to date, very few artifacts from the area can be dated between the eighth and fourth centuries B.C.

The site where most of the Early Iron Age materials come from is Su Pallosu, while other elements of material culture related to this phase come from the sites of Sa Rocca Tunda, Monte Benei and Capo Mannu. The poster presents evidence relating to each of these sites.

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